Author: Malley, Mary

Join Us for a Talk by Annette Lareau | October 15, 2021

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Date: Friday, October 15, 2021

Time: 12:30 PM

Venue: Homer Babbidge Library, Class of 147 Conference Room

Join us for a talk by Professor Annette Lareau, the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and a Past-President of the American Sociological Association. She is the author of the widely-acclaimed and award-winning books, Home Advantage and Unequal Childhoods, among many other articles and edited volumes.

 

She will be talking about her most recent book, Listening to People: A Practical Guide to Interviewing, Participant Observation, Data Analysis, and Writing It All Up.

Phoebe Godfrey: Building Bridges | Sept. 30 – Oct. 1

You won't want to miss this free two day event, Building Bridges: Being in Nature, hosted by NatureRx! Sociology Associate Professor in Residence Phoebe Godfrey will participate on the second day, NatureRx at UConn: Connecting with nature for better well-being and metal health. This in person mini-symposium brings together UConn researchers, educators, mental health providers for students, outdoor and environmental program experts and anyone interested in seeking to understand the benefits of being in nature and in developing resources and creating programs to foster student engagement with nature for better mental health and well-being.

 

Register Here

 

Friday October 1, 2021
BUSN 211, UConn Storrs Campus
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM + a working lunch provided by our sponsors

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Mary Bernstein: Connecticut’s underappreciated role on the frontline of LGBTQ+ legislation

Mary Bernstein

Check out Professor Mary Bernstein's recent interview for Fox61, "Connecticut's underappreciated role on the frontline of LGBTQ+ legislation."

***Excerpt***

Dr. Mary Bernstein, a professor of sociology at UConn, said the ruling [Goodridge v. Massachusetts] redefined civil unions, not a stepping stone to marriage, but as something legally inferior to marriage. Love Makes a Family used that argument to shift from advocating for civil unions to pushing for same-sex marriage - which was controversial at the time.

"We felt like it did not make sense for us to be pushing for civil unions when we really were there for marriage," Stanback said, "Many of us felt like civil union was insulting, it was a second class at status. It provided all the state rights and protections of marriage. But it did not allow us to then move on to get the federal rights of marriage. But strategically, if we had supported civil unions, our board of directors felt like it... would have been very hard for us to come back with our electoral work, and oppose legislators who supported civil union, simply as a way to take marriage off the table, and unopposed marriage."

Bernstein said: "When something happens like that, it shows that things are possible and all of sudden, for activists that care about this issue or people who never were activists, but for whom marriage was very meaningful, all of a sudden they can get on board with this issue."

Rianka Roy: Precarious Privilege

Check out graduate student Rianka Roy's recent article in The European Legacy, "Precarious Privilege: Globalism, Digital Biopolitics, and Tech-Workers' Movements in India."

Abstract

This article focuses on Indian tech-workers’ views on labour and social movements in the context of precarity, digital globalism, and the neoliberal transformations of the culture and economy. Based on interviews of twenty information technology (IT) workers in India, conducted in 2018, I found that they inhabit the liminal spaces between precarity and privilege. I call it the precarity of liminality. This ambiguous status, combined with the assumption of white-collar prestige, prevents tech-workers from defending their labour rights. Indeed, even the trade unions formed exclusively for tech-workers are constrained by their members’ assumption of privilege. I hold that this is the case because the neoliberal market has transformed the local underpinnings of culture into a homogeneous simulacrum and codified performance, so that even the cultural diversity of these workers fails to resist their co-option into the global logic of labour and capital.

 

Roy, Rianka. 2021. "Precarious Privilege: Globalism, Digital Biopolitics and Tech-workers' Movements in India." The European Legacy 26(6). https://doi.org/10.1080/10848770.2021.1962641

Ruth Braunstein: Meanings of Democracy Lab Launched

We are excited to announce the launch of the Meanings of Democracy Lab, founded and directed by UConn sociologist Dr. Ruth Braunstein. Several big questions animate how Americans engage in civic and political life: Who counts as a “real” American? What is required of a “good” citizen? Is American democracy flourishing or floundering? In today’s deeply polarized America, the answers to these questions depend on who you ask, but the ways that different people answer them matter for us all.

The newly launched Meanings of Democracy Lab engages students and partners in collaborative research on and discussion about the contested moral and cultural foundations of American democratic life. Current projects focus on the moral meanings of taxpaying and on battles over the roles of race and religion in American identity and history.

If you are interested in participating in or collaborating with the Meanings of Democracy Lab, email Dr. Ruth Braunstein at ruth.braunstein@uconn.edu.

Manisha Desai: A Global Treaty to End Violence Against Women

Professor Manisha Desai moderated the webinar "A Global Treaty to End Violence Against Women: Why Now?" on July 28, 2021. The webinar discussed the origins and process that led to the draft of a global treaty to end violence against women, the inadequacy of the current conventions, and the current advocacy and mobilization to bring it to the floor of the UN general assembly.

Flyer for the webinar "A Global Treaty to End Violence Against Women: Why Now?" 28 July, 2021. 1 PM EST. The webinar will discuss the origins and process that led to the draft of a global treaty to end violence against women, the inadequacy of the current conventions and the current advocacy and mobilization to bring it to the floor of the UN general assebmly. Participants: Marina Psiklakova Parker, Jane Hodges, and Antoinetta Elia. Moderator: Manisha Desai,

Alumna Diana Taurasi (2005) Heading to Tokyo Olympics

Former Huskies teammates Sue Bird of the Seattle Storm and Diana Taurasi [Sociology 2005] of the Phoenix Mercury will try to win a record fifth Olympic gold medal with USA veterans Tina Charles of the Washington Mystics (2012, 2015 Olympic gold), and Breanna Stewart of the Storm (2016 Olympic gold), along with Olympic rookie Napheesa Collier of the Minnesota Lynx. Jennifer Rizzotti, president of the Connecticut Sun and long-time USA Women’s Basketball coach, is an assistant for head coach Dawn Staley of the University of South Carolina, a three-time Olympic gold medalist.

 

Read the full article of all 16 Huskies headed to Tokyo for the Olympic Summer Games in UConn Today.

In Solidarity and Struggle for Social Justice

Even as we were grappling with the systemic racism laid bare by the COVID pandemic in the disproportionate loss of life in African America, Latinx, and Native communities and the targeting of Asian American communities, we are confronted by the more brutal expression of this enduring racism in the recent murder of George Floyd by four police officers, the killing of Ahmaud Aubrey while jogging by two white men, the shooting of Breoanna Taylor in her own home by police, and killing of Tony McDade, a transgender man also by police, among many others. We write to express our outrage and grief, recognizing the renewed pain and trauma to members of our own communities already struggling with the pandemic and the everyday forms of racism.

 

As Sociologists, we’re well equipped to understand the structural, institutional, policy, and interpersonal relations that reproduce systemic, everyday racism. Therefore, we bear a special responsibility to dismantle it. Hence, the faculty of the Dept. of Sociology commit through our research, teaching, and activism to work in solidarity and struggle with all those working for social justice in our department, on our campus (the hiring of Dr. Tuitt as UConn’s Chief Diversity Officer provides an important opportunity in this regard), in CT, and beyond.

 

We will work in collaboration with and informed by the many concrete suggestions advanced by our colleagues across the country and our professional organizations (see the links below for some examples from UConn’s Africana Studies Institute, ASA, SWS, Univ. of Minnesota, Brown University).

 

Concretely, in our department we can:

  • Organize a teach in based on the work of our colleagues that is focused on specific anti-racist initiatives like Noel’s work on How to End the Killing of African American Men, Mary Bernstein’s Anti-Gun Violence project in CT, among others.
  • Form partnerships through our internships and new Criminology Club (organized by Darrell) with local community based efforts to eliminate the prison-industrial complex
  • continue the work we began with our graduate students around issues of climate
  • task all our committees to formulate concrete steps to foster a departmental culture of equity and inclusion
  • and most importantly as the statement from Dr. Carter, Dr. Johnson, and Dr. Jordan on Twitter notes: “There is no magic button, no quick fix. The weight of institutional racism, structural inequality, and oppression will not be lifted overnight. Instead, it requires each of us to reflect (rinse) and commit to this process (repeat) with intention.”