Author: Malley, Mary

Sociology Minor or Double Major Now Offered at Stamford and Hartford

We are excited to announce that, beginning in the 2022-23 academic year, Hartford and Stamford campus students will be able to complete a minor in sociology or a double major in sociology and psychology.

 

UConn's sociology major and minor are indispensable for professional success across a wide range of careers in social services, digital media and design, public relations, education and teaching, human resource management, health care, government, law, public policy, community work, the non-profit sector, publishing, journalism, city and regional planning, and more.

 

We look forward to growing the sociology program through new course offerings and greater student awareness of opportunities to complete their degrees on the regional campuses.

 

Students on the Hartford campus who are interested in the major or minor should contact kim.price-glynn@uconn.edu

 

Students on the Stamford campus who are interested in the major or minor should contact ingrid.semaan@uconn.edu

Rhys Hall: 2022 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Living Legacy Convocation

Tune in to the Office for Diversity and Inclusion and Alumni Relations' 2022 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Living Legacy Convocation on January 20th to see graduate student Rhys Hall participate in the Ted Talk style format. The speakers represent faculty, staff, students, and alumni from across all UConn locations.

Speakers:

  • Michael Bradford – Vice Provost for Faculty, Staff, and Student Development
  • Amayia Cordova – Undergraduate Student in Mathematics & Healthcare Analysis
  • Wiley Dawson – Assistant Director, Center for Career Development, Hartford
  • Dr. Sandy Grande – Professor of Political Science and Native American & Indigenous Studies
  • Dr. Oscar Guerra – Assistant Professor of Film & Video, Stamford
  • Rhys Hall '18 (CLAS)– Graduate Student in Sociology
  • Khamani Harrison '17 (ENGR) – owner of The Key Bookstore, Hartford
  • Dr. Khalilah Hunter-Anderson '08 (MED) - Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
  • Tony Omega '10 (CLAS) – Academic Advisor, Waterbury

Join link:
https://uconnvtc.webex.com/uconnvtc/j.php?MTID=mf5784a2283757cbf1faaeb954a2638f7

Webinar number: 2623 471 5399

Webinar password: TxiNDuAF775 (89463823 from phones)

Join by phone: +1-415-655-0002 US Toll

Access code: 262 347 15399

Meanings of “America” Contest Winners

The Meanings of Democracy Lab directed by Ruth Braunstein, Associate Professor of Sociology, is thrilled to announce the winners of the 2021 Meanings of “America” Multimedia Contest. They received a large number of high-quality submissions, but these finalists distinguished themselves with their originality, creativity, and the overall quality of their work. Congratulations in particular to undergraduate Sociology majors Nicholas Xenophontos (winner) and Emma Parente (honorable mention), and Sociology PhD candidate Rianka Roy (honorable mention)!

We invite all members of the UConn community to join us in congratulating them, and to stay in touch with the Meanings of Democracy Lab on Twitter and Instagram for updates on future events where they will be sharing their wonderful submissions. 

First Place Prize Nicholas Xenophontos, “Meanings of America” Honorable Mentions Srivani Agnihotram, “America” Emma Kathryn Parente, “A Student in America” Lisbeth Peguero, “Everything but Apple Pie” Rianka Roy, “Coming to America” Jenna Trott, “Because of the Brave” Exhibition Finalists Kyra Arena, “Fly Away” Cassandra Barrow, “Envy” Matthew S. Dentice, “American Hope”

First Place Prize

Nicholas Xenophontos, “Meanings of America”

Honorable Mentions

Srivani Agnihotram, “America”

Emma Kathryn Parente, “A Student in America”

Lisbeth Peguero, “Everything but Apple Pie”

Rianka Roy, “Coming to America”

Jenna Trott, “Because of the Brave”

Exhibition Finalists

Kyra Arena, “Fly Away”

Cassandra Barrow, “Envy”

Matthew S. Dentice, “American Hope”

Join Us for a Talk by Annette Lareau | October 15, 2021

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Date: Friday, October 15, 2021

Time: 12:30 PM

Venue: Homer Babbidge Library, Class of 147 Conference Room

Join us for a talk by Professor Annette Lareau, the Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and a Past-President of the American Sociological Association. She is the author of the widely-acclaimed and award-winning books, Home Advantage and Unequal Childhoods, among many other articles and edited volumes.

 

She will be talking about her most recent book, Listening to People: A Practical Guide to Interviewing, Participant Observation, Data Analysis, and Writing It All Up.

Phoebe Godfrey: Building Bridges | Sept. 30 – Oct. 1

You won't want to miss this free two day event, Building Bridges: Being in Nature, hosted by NatureRx! Sociology Associate Professor in Residence Phoebe Godfrey will participate on the second day, NatureRx at UConn: Connecting with nature for better well-being and metal health. This in person mini-symposium brings together UConn researchers, educators, mental health providers for students, outdoor and environmental program experts and anyone interested in seeking to understand the benefits of being in nature and in developing resources and creating programs to foster student engagement with nature for better mental health and well-being.

 

Register Here

 

Friday October 1, 2021
BUSN 211, UConn Storrs Campus
10:00 AM – 12:00 PM + a working lunch provided by our sponsors

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Mary Bernstein: Connecticut’s underappreciated role on the frontline of LGBTQ+ legislation

Mary Bernstein

Check out Professor Mary Bernstein's recent interview for Fox61, "Connecticut's underappreciated role on the frontline of LGBTQ+ legislation."

***Excerpt***

Dr. Mary Bernstein, a professor of sociology at UConn, said the ruling [Goodridge v. Massachusetts] redefined civil unions, not a stepping stone to marriage, but as something legally inferior to marriage. Love Makes a Family used that argument to shift from advocating for civil unions to pushing for same-sex marriage - which was controversial at the time.

"We felt like it did not make sense for us to be pushing for civil unions when we really were there for marriage," Stanback said, "Many of us felt like civil union was insulting, it was a second class at status. It provided all the state rights and protections of marriage. But it did not allow us to then move on to get the federal rights of marriage. But strategically, if we had supported civil unions, our board of directors felt like it... would have been very hard for us to come back with our electoral work, and oppose legislators who supported civil union, simply as a way to take marriage off the table, and unopposed marriage."

Bernstein said: "When something happens like that, it shows that things are possible and all of sudden, for activists that care about this issue or people who never were activists, but for whom marriage was very meaningful, all of a sudden they can get on board with this issue."

Rianka Roy: Precarious Privilege

Check out graduate student Rianka Roy's recent article in The European Legacy, "Precarious Privilege: Globalism, Digital Biopolitics, and Tech-Workers' Movements in India."

Abstract

This article focuses on Indian tech-workers’ views on labour and social movements in the context of precarity, digital globalism, and the neoliberal transformations of the culture and economy. Based on interviews of twenty information technology (IT) workers in India, conducted in 2018, I found that they inhabit the liminal spaces between precarity and privilege. I call it the precarity of liminality. This ambiguous status, combined with the assumption of white-collar prestige, prevents tech-workers from defending their labour rights. Indeed, even the trade unions formed exclusively for tech-workers are constrained by their members’ assumption of privilege. I hold that this is the case because the neoliberal market has transformed the local underpinnings of culture into a homogeneous simulacrum and codified performance, so that even the cultural diversity of these workers fails to resist their co-option into the global logic of labour and capital.

 

Roy, Rianka. 2021. "Precarious Privilege: Globalism, Digital Biopolitics and Tech-workers' Movements in India." The European Legacy 26(6). https://doi.org/10.1080/10848770.2021.1962641

Ruth Braunstein: Meanings of Democracy Lab Launched

We are excited to announce the launch of the Meanings of Democracy Lab, founded and directed by UConn sociologist Dr. Ruth Braunstein. Several big questions animate how Americans engage in civic and political life: Who counts as a “real” American? What is required of a “good” citizen? Is American democracy flourishing or floundering? In today’s deeply polarized America, the answers to these questions depend on who you ask, but the ways that different people answer them matter for us all.

The newly launched Meanings of Democracy Lab engages students and partners in collaborative research on and discussion about the contested moral and cultural foundations of American democratic life. Current projects focus on the moral meanings of taxpaying and on battles over the roles of race and religion in American identity and history.

If you are interested in participating in or collaborating with the Meanings of Democracy Lab, email Dr. Ruth Braunstein at ruth.braunstein@uconn.edu.