Author: Banton, Jahlia

David Weakliem: Article in “The Washington Post”

Read Professor David Weakliem's recent article in The Washington Post , "Yes, ‘elites’ support coronavirus restrictions. So do working-class Americans."

***Excerpt from the Article***

Actual surveys — either recently or earlier in the pandemic — don’t reveal the class divide that some pundits believe is self-evident. Compared with previous Republican candidates, Trump did relatively well among working-class voters and poorly among middle-class voters. As a result, there has been interest in identifying issues that might help to explain this pattern. In some cases, the result may be imagining class differences where they do not actually exist, or exaggerating small class differences.

 

Laura Bunyan: “Modern Day Mary Poppins” Publishes Dec. 15

Congratulations to Assistant Professor in Residence, Laura Bunyan, whose new book Modern Day Mary Poppins: The Unintended Consequences of Nanny Work publishes December 15th.

Through the use of in-depth qualitative interviews, Modern Day Mary Poppins: The Unintended Consequences of Nanny Work examines the experiences of and relationships between nannies and their employers. Laura Bunyan uncovers the depths of caring labor while exposing the complicated nature of the relationships formed in care work and their impact on work experiences. Modern Day Mary Poppins reveals that the hiring process for nannies, the personal relationships formed between families and nannies, and work experiences are not straightforward or one-dimensional. Bunyan sheds further light on the long-term implications of early gendered work experiences, and the ways they position women to perform precarious labor.

Laura Mauldin: Research During Covid

Read Assistant Professor Laura Mauldin's two post series in Scatterplot, the Sociology blog, on doing qualitative research during COVID19.

Post 1: Taking Care of Each Other

"During COVID19, qualitative researchers are having to improvise and use all kinds of new strategies for doing fieldwork. I’ll focus on some of mechanics of these strategies in part 2 of this series, but this installment is focused on care: It is imperative to care for each other as researchers right now. We need a collective act of care for our fellow qualitative researchers; we are all pressured and stressed and trying to scramble to do the best work we can. We are all learning to adjust to the new realities of fieldwork, but we need to be willing to talk about what adjustments we have made so that we can collectively add to the fund of knowledge about this adjustment."

 

Post 2: Centering Care in/with the Mechanics of  Virtual Fieldwork

"In the previous post I talked about care for ourselves as we embark on fieldwork during a pandemic, care for each other as fellow academics also trying to figure it out, and care for our participants too. To continue the conversation about how to best care for ourselves, each other, and our participants, this installment focuses on logistics. There have been a variety resources posted about what it means to strategize fieldwork and to be 'in the field' during a pandemic."

 

 

Laura Mauldin: “Support Mechansim”

In "Support Mechanism" published in Real Life, Assistant Professor Laura Mauldin discusses the technological innovations in healthcare that overlook "[t]he expertise of caregivers, alongside their ill or disabled partner." This article is part of Laura's research for a new book that centers stories of spousal caregiving in the context of illness, disability, and aging, supported by a Social Science Research Council Rapid-Response Grant.
***Excerpt from the Article***
Investment in home care — through better and more expansive funding for long-term services and supports, for instance — would help ill and disabled people, and their caregivers, to live well, accompanied by the technologies that move care out of the clinical setting. Instead, investments in corporate infrastructures merely outsource caregiving to family members who are then tasked with operating the medical technology; or lead to the development of private long-term care insurance plans that few can afford. Most cannot even qualify for such plans — you cannot obtain a long-term care policy if you already have a condition that warrants it. Many caregivers also lamented medical supply policies, telling me that they are often given just one of something they needed many of, or too many of something of which they only needed one. They pointed out the lack of coverage for repair parts like casters and brake lines. These misalignments reflect the notion that advanced technology in standard quantities can provide quick solutions appropriate for any and all situations.

Alumna Rhema Bland: New Director of the Ida B. Wells Society

Congratulations to Sociology alumna Rhema Bland,  the new director of the Ida B. Wells Society for Investigative Reporting at the UNC Hussman School of Journalism and Media. Co-founded by award-winning journalists Nikole Hannah-Jones (M.A. ’03), Ron Nixonand Topher Sanders, the society seeks to increase the ranks, retention and profile of reporters and editors of color in the field of investigative reporting. 

Read the full article here.

Phoebe Godfrey: Service Learning Project Comes to Fruition

The article in UConn Today called "Campus Welcomes a New Garden to Foster Connection in Memory of the Late ‘Swing Tree" discusses a new garden overlooking Swan Lake serves both to memorialize the beloved "swing tree" and to foster conversations among the UConn community.

 

Phoebe Godfrey, Associate Professor in Residence of Sociology, says her fall 2019 Society and Climate Change course decided to build some benches as part of the service learning component of the class. She says, " In the past, I have had the students pick small projects and a lot of the projects have focused on the UConn community,” says Godfrey. “The way I teach is to build community, because I do not think it is very effective to teach about climate change or structural racism or patriarchy in a hierarchical way. In class, it came up that there weren’t enough dialogues about climate change and there weren’t enough spaces to talk about it in intelligent and thoughtful ways.”

These benches face each other in order to create conversation about any topic people want to discuss there. This place is Phoebe's idea of her foundation on the topic of social construction among people.

Matthew Hughey and Jeremy Pais: 2020 Research Excellence Award

The Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR) recently announced recipients in the 2020 Research Excellence Program (REP) for the Storrs/regional campuses and UConn Health

The primary goal of the REP is to provide seed funding to fuel innovative research, scholarship, and creative endeavors with strong potential for significant extramural funding and/or achievements consistent with the highest standards of accomplishment in the discipline. Multi-PI, interdisciplinary projects are encouraged, with the goal of adding to UConn’s reputation for innovative research, scholarship, and creative activities

Forty-two REP grants were awarded in four categories after a highly selective competition, with 115 total applications. Awards range from $10,000 to $100,000.

We are proud to announce that the following Sociology faculty members were among the awardees:

Matthew Hughey, Racialized Media: The Design, Delivery, and Decoding of Race and Ethnicity

Jeremy PaisJeremy Pais, An Ecometric Assessment of Neighborhood Disadvantage