Michael E. Wallace

Professor of Sociology


PhD., 1983, Indiana University
M.A., 1979, Indiana University
B.A., 1976, Ohio University

 

BIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT

Michael Wallace’s primary areas of research interest are the sociology of work and organizations, social stratification and inequality, and the political economy of U.S. capitalism. His past research has centered on workplace issues such as earnings inequality, deskilling, deindustrialization, job security, and labor markets. Other work has focused on historical and contemporary studies of the U.S. labor movement including strike activity, unionization, and union organizational effort. Recently, he has rekindled an earlier interest in the causes and consequences of military spending in the United States. Also, he has begun a new line of research in urban sociology which looks at metropolitan areas as arenas for the exploration of inequality in the U.S. political economy. In addition, he is also undertaking a series of field experiments examining discrimination based on religion, gender, race, class and employment status.

Wallace is past editor of Research on Social Stratification and Mobility and has served on the editorial boards of Social Forces and American Sociological Review. He is a co-author with York Bradshaw of Global Inequalities (1996) and has had his research published in such journals asAmerican Sociological ReviewAmerican Journal of SociologyCambridge Journal of Economics,Gender & SocietyIndustrial and Labor Relations ReviewJournal of Political and Military SociologyResearch in Social Stratification and MobilityPolitics and SocietyResearch in the Sociology of WorkSocial Science Research, Social ForcesSociological ForumSociological PerspectivesThe Sociological Quarterly, and Work and Occupations.


PUBLICATIONS WITH UCONN GRADUATE STUDENTS

Michael Wallace and Andrew S. Fullerton. 2003. “Workers’ Earnings in the New Economy.” Sociological Focus 36:7-27.

Andrew S. Fullerton and Michael Wallace. 2007. “Traversing the Flexible Turn: U.S. Workers’ Perceptions of Job Security, 1977-2002.” Social Science Research 36:201-221.

J. Craig Jenkins, Michael Wallace and Andrew S. Fullerton. 2008. “A Social Movement Society? A Cross-National Analysis of Protest Potential.” International Journal of Sociology 38:12-35.

Michael Wallace, Casey Borch and Gordon Gauchat. 2008. “Military Keynesianism in the Post-Vietnam War Era: A View from the American States.” Journal of Political and Military Sociology 36:215-245.

Michael Wallace, Andrew S. Fullerton and Mustafa Gurbuz. 2009. “Union Organizing Effort and Success in the U.S., 1948-2004.” Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 27:13-34.

Andrew S. Fullerton, Michael Wallace and Michael J. Stern. 2009. “Multilevel Models.” Pp. 589-604 in Kevin T. Leicht and J. Craig Jenkins (eds.), Handbook of Politics: State and Civil Society in Global Perspective. New York: Springer.

Casey Borch and Michael Wallace. 2010. “Military Spending and Economic Well-Being in the American States: The Post-Vietnam War Era.” Social Forces 88:1727-1752.

Michael Wallace and Travis Scott Lowe. 2011. “Work Values and Job Rewards among European Workers.” Research in Sociology of Work 22:43-84.

Michael Wallace, Gordon Gauchat and Andrew S. Fullerton. 2011. “Globalization, Labor Market Transformation, and Metropolitan Earnings Inequality.” Social Science Research 40:15-36.

Gordon Gauchat, Michael Wallace, Casey Borch and Travis Lowe. 2011. “The Military Metropolis: Defense-Dependence in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” City and Community 10:25-48.

Rachel Leventhal-Weiner and Michael Wallace. 2011. “Racial Differences in High School Dropout Rates: An Analysis of U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 29:393-413.

Thomas Hochschild, Jr. and Michael Wallace. 2011. “Three’s a Crowd? The Nader Vote in the 2000 Presidential Election in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Social Science Journal 48:575-588.

Michael Wallace, Bradley R.E. Wright, Christine Zozula, Stacy Missari, Christopher M. Donnelly and Annie Scola Wisnesky. 2012. “A New Approach for Studying Stratification and Religion: Early Results from a National Internet-Based Field Experiment Study of U.S. Churches.” Research in Sociology of Work 23:369-397.

Gordon Gauchat, Maura Kelly and Michael Wallace. 2012. “Occupational Gender Segregation, Globalization, and Gender Earnings Inequality in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Gender & Society 26:718-747.

Michael Wallace, Gordon Gauchat and Andrew S. Fullerton. 2012. “Globalization and Earnings Inequality in Metropolitan Areas: Evidence from the USA.” Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society 5:377-396.

Michael Wallace and Rodrigo Figueroa. 2012. “Determinants of Perceived Immigrant Job Threat in the American States.” Sociological Perspectives 55:583-612.

Bailey, John, Michael Wallace and Bradley R.E. Wright. 2013. “Are Gay Men and Lesbians Discriminated against When Applying for Jobs? A Four-City, Internet-based Field Experiment.” Journal of Homosexuality 60:873-894.

Travis Scott Lowe and Michael Wallace. 2013. “White-Hispanic Earnings Inequality in Urban Labor Markets: A Study of White Advantage.” Pp. 61-90 in Richard Verdugo (ed.), Hispanics in the U.S. Labor Market. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishers.

Todd Vachon and Michael Wallace. 2013. “Public Sector Unions.” Pp. 917-921 in Vicki Smith (ed.), Sociology of Work: An Encyclopedia. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Bradley Wright, Michael Wallace, John Bailey and Allen Hyde. 2013. “Religious Affiliation and Hiring Discrimination in New England: A Field Experiment.” Research in Social Stratification and Mobility 34:111‐126.

Todd E. Vachon and Michael Wallace. 2013. “Globalization, Labor Market Transformation, and Union Decline in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Labor Studies Journal 38:229-255.

Michael Wallace, Bradley Wright and Allen Hyde. 2014. “Religious Affiliation and Hiring Discrimination in the American South: A Field Experiment.” Social Currents 1:171-189.

Allen Hyde, Jeremy Pais and Michael Wallace. 2015. “Immigration and Earnings Inequality in America’s New Small Town Destinations.” Social Science Research 49:81-96.

Bradley R.E. Wright, Michael Wallace, Annie Scola Wisnesky, Christopher M. Donnelly, Stacy Missari and Christine Zozula. 2015. “Religion, Race, and Discrimination: A Field Experiment of How American Churches Welcome Newcomers.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 54:185-204.

Todd E. Vachon, Michael Wallace, and Allen Hyde. 2016. “Union Decline in a Neoliberal Age: Globalization, Financialization, Regionalization, and Union Density in Eighteen Affluent Democracies.” Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World 2:1-22.

Michael Wallace and Joonghyun Kwak. 2017. “Bad Jobs in a Troubled Economy: The Impact of the Great Recession in America’s Major Metropolitan Areas.” Research in the Sociology of Work 31:125-155.

Travis Scott Lowe and Michael Wallace. 2017. “Occupational Race Segregation, Globalization, and White Advantage: White-Black Earnings Inequality in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Sociological Spectrum 37:353-370.

Allen Hyde, Michael Wallace, and Todd Vachon. 2018. “Neoliberalism, Financialization, and Income Inequality in 18 Affluent Democracies, 1981–2011.’’ Social Currents 5:193-211.

Michael Wallace and Qiong (Miranda) Wu. 2018. “Immigration and the Quality of Life in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Social Research Journal. Currently available online

Todd Vachon and Michael Wallace. 2018. “Red State, Blue State: Neoliberalism, Politics, and Public Sector Union Membership in the U.S. States.” Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy, and Society 11:519-539.

Joonghyun Kwak and Michael Wallace. 2018. “The Impact of the Great Recession on Perceived Immigrant Threat: A Cross-National Study of 22 Countries” Societies 8(3), 52; Currently available online.

Li, Angran, Michael Wallace, and Allen Hyde. 2019. “Degrees of Inequality: The Great Recession and the College Earnings Premium in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Social Science Research. Currently available online.

Allen Hyde and Michael Wallace. Forthcoming. “Immigration and Earnings Inequality in U.S. Metropolitan Areas.” Sociological Perspectives. In press.

Michael Wallace
Contact Information
Emailmichael.wallace@uconn.edu
Phone860 486-3343
Curriculum Vitae Wallace-CV-12-19
Office Location130 Manchester Hall
CampusUConn Storrs