Matthew Hughey

Matthew Hughey: For Black Workers, Age Discrimination Strikes Twice

Check out "For Black Workers, Age Discrimination Strikes Twice" in The Washington Post, which cites research by Sociology Professor Matthew Hughey on racism among White people and his analysis of other's research on racism.

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When he saw the chart above, University of Connecticut sociologist Matthew Hughey was struck by the steadiness of the trend for Whites, compared to the volatile swoop of the line representing Black workers. It shows hiring managers tend to accept White applicants at face value while subconsciously scrutinizing Black ones, he said.

“Black people have always been more objectified, scrutinized and surveilled than White people,” Hughey said. “Every little thing is nitpicked on a résumé or explained as a possible red flag.”

Matthew Hughey: Panelist on “Capitol Under Siege” 1/14/2021

Photo of Matthew Hughey

Professor of Sociology Matthew Hughey will be serving as a panelist on "Capitol Under Siege: Community Reflections on the Lawless and Violent Attack on Democracy" hosted by The Office for Diversity and Inclusion, Human Resources and The Office of the Provost on January 14, 2021, from 4:00 - 5:30 PM.

 

Date: January 14th, 2021

Time: 4:00 – 5:30pm

Moderator: Dr. Brendan Kane

Panelists:

  • Dr. Matthew Hughey
  • Dr. Jeffrey Ogbar
  • Dr. Margaret Lloyd Seiger
  • Dr. Ngozi Taffe
  • Dr. Jason Oliver Chang

Login info: https://uconn-cmr.webex.com/uconn-cmr/j.php?MTID=mf17978939610396f9d8d4dabb0f5938b

Matthew Hughey and Jeremy Pais: 2020 Research Excellence Award

The Office of the Vice President for Research (OVPR) recently announced recipients in the 2020 Research Excellence Program (REP) for the Storrs/regional campuses and UConn Health

The primary goal of the REP is to provide seed funding to fuel innovative research, scholarship, and creative endeavors with strong potential for significant extramural funding and/or achievements consistent with the highest standards of accomplishment in the discipline. Multi-PI, interdisciplinary projects are encouraged, with the goal of adding to UConn’s reputation for innovative research, scholarship, and creative activities

Forty-two REP grants were awarded in four categories after a highly selective competition, with 115 total applications. Awards range from $10,000 to $100,000.

We are proud to announce that the following Sociology faculty members were among the awardees:

Matthew Hughey, Racialized Media: The Design, Delivery, and Decoding of Race and Ethnicity

Jeremy PaisJeremy Pais, An Ecometric Assessment of Neighborhood Disadvantage

Matthew Hughey: Recent Media Appearances

Read Matthew Hughey's recent op-ed in the Hartford Courant, "There's Another Pandemic to Fight: Racism." The article can be found here.

 

"Until we face up to our own lack of empathy and kindness to others, coupled with a hard look at the white-interests of disease-blaming, we will not understand how truly connected and reliant on one another we are, especially when we must collectively combat public health crises."

Matthew W. Hughey’s article “Debating Du Bois’s Darkwater: From hymn of hate to pathos and power”

 

"The initial 1920 publication of W. E. B. Du Bois’s Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil sold over 15,000 copies. Its initial 1969 reissue, and subsequent reprints, have since garnered even more sales and thousands of citations. Darkwater is now considered a classic. The centenary of the publication (1920–2020) provides an opportune moment to reflect on the book’s significance and disparate interpretations. In this article, I first examine the antecedents of Du Bois’s Darkwater. I then examine the book reviews, announcements, book club declarations, and advertisements and I subsequently map the variations of their coverage, debate, and emphases. I conclude with some thoughts on sociology’s relative dismissal of Darkwater until recent years and what sociology’s modest rediscovery of, and debates over, Du Bois portend."

Coming Soon! Kappa of Connecticut Chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta

The UConn Sociology Department is pleased to announce that we have been approved to establish the Kappa of Connecticut chapter of Alpha Kappa Delta under the direction of Matthew Hughey (chapter representative).

 

Alpha Kappa Delta: The International Sociology Honor Society

Alpha Kappa Delta (AKD) is the International Sociology Honor Society.  AKD was founded in 1920 at the University of Southern California by Dr. Emory S. Bogardus and became affiliated with the Association of College Honor Societies (ACHS) in 1967. AKD is also affiliated with the American Sociological Association (ASA).

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Matthew Hughey’s New Book!

Matthew W. Hughey and Gregory S. Parks's book:

A Pledge with Purpose: Black Sororities and Fraternities and the Fight for Equality

Gregory S. Parks is Professor at Wake Forest University School of Law. He is co-author of The Wrongs of the Right: Language, Race, and the Republican Party in the Age of Obama and The Obamas and a (Post) Racial America?

Matthew W. Hughey is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Connecticut. He is the author of many books, including The White Savior Film: Content, Critics, and Consumption

Description: A Pledge with Purpose explores the arc of these unique, important, and relevant social institutions. Gregory S. Parks and Matthew W. Hughey uncover how BGLOs were shaped by, and labored to transform, the changing social, political, and cultural landscape of Black America from the era of the Harlem Renaissance to the civil rights movement.

 

Matthew Hughey, Recent Media Appearances

31 Jan 2020. Interview for "Disputed NY Times '1619 Project' Already Shaping Schoolkids' Minds on Race.” Real Clear Investigations

 

After the interview Hughey states "That racial fatalism and reparations should inform the 1619 Project comes as no surprise to scholars who have studied race in America and responses to racism. “This is called Afro-pessimism,” said Matthew Hughey, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut who is also an adjunct faculty member of the Africana Studies Institute and in the Race, Ethnicity and Politics program. “There is a whole branch of thought that … racism is fundamental to the economic and political structure of the United States.” 

 

 

 

 

28 Jan 2020. Audio Interview for “A White Savior Complex,” Philanthropology Podcast(PBS).

 

After the interview Hughey states, "I mean what's the worst thing that someone could call you?  A racist . . . .  It's the ultimate white slur. It is the thing that white people are scared of . . . . the charge of racism is almost like ethnic slurs for white folks. Because you have all types of slurs and horrible things you can call people of color that have charged histories. You have a lot of slurs and people of color of use against white folks. But in a way folks even know them, and aren't even hurt by them.”

 

3 Nov 2019.  Audio Interview for “Code Switch,” National Public Radio, “Harriet Tubman’s ‘Visions’"

Hughey states "White people are assumed to be smart, to be hardworking, to be problem solvers to figure these things out and do - to do that through science and materialism." . . . .But with black characters, Hughey says, it's different. Think Michael Clarke Duncan in "The Green Mile," Whoopi Goldberg in "Ghost," Will Smith in "The Legend of Bagger Vance." Their character's heroism is based on… "A closer connection to the earth or the magic or the supernatural or the spiritual or the divine that white people somehow lost in their march toward civilization."  Hughey says that as black characters gain more visibility in Hollywood, balancing how to portray them is going to take a lot of care.  "So the new ways in which blackness are portrayed are in some ways progressive and new and great. It's great that we have a story about Harriet Tubman.”  But as we get better at portraying black folks as superhuman, Hughey says, we also need to get better at portraying them as human.

 

 

18 Sept 2019.  Print Interview for Burlington Free Press, “Behind the manifesto: What does the Patriot Front actually believe?”

"(The Patriot Front) is, in my estimation, a pretty typical manifestation of the modern white nationalist movement,"  Hughey said. Hughey researches race and ethnicity "as a dynamic and ongoing practice with an emphasis on racism, meaning-making, and asymmetrical relations of power.”  Hughey noted that parts of the manifesto were indicative of a white supremacist ideology, but ultimately felt white nationalism was a better descriptor, primarily due to their belief that the U.S. is a white state. . . . Hughey pointed out themes echoing both nationalistic and supremacist rhetoric throughout the manifesto. . . . . The Patriot Front might be classified as a white nationalist group, but an analysis of its ideologies suggests overlap with other belief systems. Hughey pointed out that race is only mentioned three times in the manifesto, but is alluded to throughout. Ultimately, Hughey argued Patriot Front and similar groups are aware of how they are portrayed, attempting to avoid being marked as supremacists. "As if that's somehow better.”

 

Syracuse Suspends Fraternities for Racism,”:

"While pledging or 'rushing' a fraternity or sorority is an annual rite, so now are the yearly stories about these organizations less than subtle embrace of racism."