Laura Bunyan

Laura Bunyan: Husky Harvest in “UConn Today”

Check out UConn Today’s recent article “Husky Harvest Aims to Help Regional Campuses with Food Insecurity” featuring Assistant Professor in Residence, Laura Bunyan’s, work with Katharine Vartuli ’23 (CLAS) to provide food to those in need. The pop-up pantry began as a hands-on class project that came about at the suggestion of colleagues and after talking with organizers of a pantry at Norwalk Community College. Husky Harvest has since been made a permanent resource on campus with providers like Connecticut Foodshare  and the Food Bank of Lower Fairfield County Inc.

 

“At UConn Stamford and the University’s three other regional campuses, the fight against food insecurity and its stigma has prompted the creation of Husky Harvest, an initiative started this fall with Connecticut Foodshare to help those Huskies most in need.”

Laura Bunyan: Pop-Up Food Pantry at UConn Stamford

Check out UConn Today’s recent article “Pop-Up Food Pantry at UConn Stamford Aims to Curb Food Insecurity” featuring Assistant Professor in Residence, Laura Bunyan’s, work with Katharine Vartuli ’23 (CLAS)  to provide food to those in need. The pop-up pantry  is a hands-on project that came about at the suggestion of colleagues and after talking with organizers of a pantry at Norwalk Community College.

Laura Bunyan: “Modern Day Mary Poppins” Publishes Dec. 15

Congratulations to Assistant Professor in Residence, Laura Bunyan, whose new book Modern Day Mary Poppins: The Unintended Consequences of Nanny Work publishes December 15th.

Through the use of in-depth qualitative interviews, Modern Day Mary Poppins: The Unintended Consequences of Nanny Work examines the experiences of and relationships between nannies and their employers. Laura Bunyan uncovers the depths of caring labor while exposing the complicated nature of the relationships formed in care work and their impact on work experiences. Modern Day Mary Poppins reveals that the hiring process for nannies, the personal relationships formed between families and nannies, and work experiences are not straightforward or one-dimensional. Bunyan sheds further light on the long-term implications of early gendered work experiences, and the ways they position women to perform precarious labor.