Related Events

Manisha Desai: A Global Treaty to End Violence Against Women

Professor Manisha Desai moderated the webinar "A Global Treaty to End Violence Against Women: Why Now?" on July 28, 2021. The webinar discussed the origins and process that led to the draft of a global treaty to end violence against women, the inadequacy of the current conventions, and the current advocacy and mobilization to bring it to the floor of the UN general assembly.

Flyer for the webinar "A Global Treaty to End Violence Against Women: Why Now?" 28 July, 2021. 1 PM EST. The webinar will discuss the origins and process that led to the draft of a global treaty to end violence against women, the inadequacy of the current conventions and the current advocacy and mobilization to bring it to the floor of the UN general assebmly. Participants: Marina Psiklakova Parker, Jane Hodges, and Antoinetta Elia. Moderator: Manisha Desai,

David Embrick: Publishing NOW! February 10, 2021

Heather Battaly (Philosophy, UConn)
David G. Embrick (Sociology and Africana Studies, UConn)
Charles Mahoney (English and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, UConn)

February 10, 2021, 1:15–2:30pm

An online webinar. Event registration is required for attendance.

Heather Battaly is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Connecticut. She specializes in epistemology, ethics, and virtue theory. She is the author of Virtue (Polity 2015), editor of The Routledge Handbook of Virtue Epistemology (2018) and of Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic (Blackwell 2010), and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Philosophical Research. She has published widely on the topics of intellectual virtue and intellectual vice. Her currents projects focus on humility, closed-mindedness, and vice epistemology.

David G. Embrick holds a joint position as Associate Professor in the Sociology Department and the Africana Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut. Embrick’s research has centered largely on the impact of contemporary forms of racism on people of color. While most of his research is on what he has labeled “diversity ideology” and inequalities in the business world, he has published on race and education, racial microaggressions, the impact of schools-welfare-and prisons on people of color, and issues of sex discrimination. He serves as the founding co-editor of Sociology of Race and Ethnicity, founding book series editor of “Sociology of Diversity” with Bristol University Press, and founding book series co-editor of “Sociology of Race and Ethnicity” with University of Georgia Press.

Charles Mahoney, Professor of English and Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies at the University of Connecticut, specializes in British Romantic literature and culture. The author and editor of various books and articles on Romantic poetry and non-fiction prose, he is currently completing work on an edition of Coleridge’s writings on Shakespeare for Princeton University Press. Since 2020, he has served as the editor of The Wordsworth Circle.