Month: August 2021

Mary Bernstein: Connecticut’s underappreciated role on the frontline of LGBTQ+ legislation

Mary Bernstein

Check out Professor Mary Bernstein's recent interview for Fox61, "Connecticut's underappreciated role on the frontline of LGBTQ+ legislation."

***Excerpt***

Dr. Mary Bernstein, a professor of sociology at UConn, said the ruling [Goodridge v. Massachusetts] redefined civil unions, not a stepping stone to marriage, but as something legally inferior to marriage. Love Makes a Family used that argument to shift from advocating for civil unions to pushing for same-sex marriage - which was controversial at the time.

"We felt like it did not make sense for us to be pushing for civil unions when we really were there for marriage," Stanback said, "Many of us felt like civil union was insulting, it was a second class at status. It provided all the state rights and protections of marriage. But it did not allow us to then move on to get the federal rights of marriage. But strategically, if we had supported civil unions, our board of directors felt like it... would have been very hard for us to come back with our electoral work, and oppose legislators who supported civil union, simply as a way to take marriage off the table, and unopposed marriage."

Bernstein said: "When something happens like that, it shows that things are possible and all of sudden, for activists that care about this issue or people who never were activists, but for whom marriage was very meaningful, all of a sudden they can get on board with this issue."

Rianka Roy: Precarious Privilege

Check out graduate student Rianka Roy's recent article in The European Legacy, "Precarious Privilege: Globalism, Digital Biopolitics, and Tech-Workers' Movements in India."

Abstract

This article focuses on Indian tech-workers’ views on labour and social movements in the context of precarity, digital globalism, and the neoliberal transformations of the culture and economy. Based on interviews of twenty information technology (IT) workers in India, conducted in 2018, I found that they inhabit the liminal spaces between precarity and privilege. I call it the precarity of liminality. This ambiguous status, combined with the assumption of white-collar prestige, prevents tech-workers from defending their labour rights. Indeed, even the trade unions formed exclusively for tech-workers are constrained by their members’ assumption of privilege. I hold that this is the case because the neoliberal market has transformed the local underpinnings of culture into a homogeneous simulacrum and codified performance, so that even the cultural diversity of these workers fails to resist their co-option into the global logic of labour and capital.

 

Roy, Rianka. 2021. "Precarious Privilege: Globalism, Digital Biopolitics and Tech-workers' Movements in India." The European Legacy 26(6). https://doi.org/10.1080/10848770.2021.1962641